Quick tip: Sometimes CAD is the beginning of PLM

Quick tip: Sometimes CAD is the beginning of PLM

ilogic-snipSometimes CAD can be used to start establishing PLM practices. Since PLM systems rely on data to be effective, ensuring consistent and correctly-entered information is paramount. Things like classification with properties and meta-data can rely on CAD very heavily to be effectively used. For example, let’s consider the classification and data for a machined part. If the part is going to require machining, we could assign it a classification of “Machined.” Since the part is going to be machined, we would want to ensure that “Stock Size” is one piece of meta-data to be tracked. Most CAD systems have a way to ensure this “Stock Size” is at least filled out, and some could even be automated to calculate the stock size without any user intervention. Of course a repeatable logic would need to be utilized, but once that is done, time spent completing stock size calculations and potential errors would be eliminated.

 

Case in point: Utilize iLogic in Autodesk Inventor to calculate stock size for machined parts. Once this is done, users can forget about manually checking all the measurements; all they need to do is flag the part as “Machined” and the system does the rest!

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Ben Curtin

Business Development Manager at Tata Technologies
Ben holds a BSME from Michigan Technological University and has over 20 years of experience working with CAD, CAE, PDM, and PLM solutions. He holds several Autodesk manufacturing and simulation specializations, and became one of the first Inventor Certified Experts in the early 2000s.

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Ben Curtin

Business Development Manager at Tata Technologies
Ben holds a BSME from Michigan Technological University and has over 20 years of experience working with CAD, CAE, PDM, and PLM solutions. He holds several Autodesk manufacturing and simulation specializations, and became one of the first Inventor Certified Experts in the early 2000s.