Category "Digital Factory"

There is so much more to this command than welding. Not only is there a full range of weld types, but you can also model beads of adhesives, glue, and mastic as well as fasteners like rivets for example. Basically there are three categories in Weld Assistant for joining parts, they are: discrete welds, line welds, and adhesives. Normally a rivet is a type of fastener, but they are included as a custom weld in Weld Assistant.

In this post, let’s take a look at how to model rivets. We will create a custom spot weld to mimic a rivet. We will start by configuring a custom weld spot under File + Utilities + Customer Defaults.

  • From the Customer Defaults window, select Weld Assistant + Point Locator and then select one of the Custom tabs.
  • Set the Solid Display to Cylinder and give the custom Point Locator a name… Rivet for example.
  • Set the other attributes accordingly, and then select OK to finish the configuration.

Now create a Rivet the same way you would create a Resistance Weld Spot.

  • From the Weld Assistance command select Weld Point Wizard.
  • From the Weld Point Wizard block:
    • Select your Method
    • Set the Type to the new custom Point Locator you just created (i.e. Rivet)
    • Select Next.
  • Select the Face Sets and then select Next
  • Select the points you want to create Rivets at and then select Next.
  • Select Finish to place the Rivets.

If the Rivets don’t show up at first, then select the Solid Weld Point Display option.

Key benefits to modeling welds in Cad include:

  • Provides a key piece of information necessary for a complete Digital Twin.
  • Mass properties inclusion (Weight and Volume).
  • Easy to visualize.
  • Easy to validate for correct location using Weld Advisor.
  • Easy to convey information via a Drawing or PMI
  • Available for inclusion into CAE analysis
  • Available for process planning
  • Available for robot programming
  • Significant time savings compared to manual application of welds
  • Having the ability to create and validate the Rivets in CAD ensures quality data is being sent to manufacturing thereby reducing the amount of rework.

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Do any of the questions below apply to your organization:

  • Do you own existing Dassault Systemes software products and are up to date with maintenance?
  • Do you need to transform your digital engineering processes?
  • Are you interested in implementing the true Digital Twin concept?
  • Is the technology that you are using for Digital Product Definition out of date?
  • Does your company have strategic initiatives like Lean Manufacturing, Flawless Launch, Model Based Engineering or similar?
  • Is your company expanding or looking to put new products on the market?

If the answer to any of these questions is Yes, then you should be looking at the Customer Transformation Program (CTP) from Dassault Systemes.

Dassault Systemes  launched a Customer Transformation Program for 2019 which is designed to transform the businesses of all their existing customers. This is a limited-time sales initiative program starting January 21, 2019 and ending December 31, 2019.

The program offers existing customers a voucher that makes them eligible for a discount on qualified new purchases of software from Dassault Systemes extensive range of productivity enhancing solutions. Customers can earn up to 35% off purchase of qualified new software – an exciting incentive to get up to date with the latest technology.

The future focus of Dassault Systèmes is on the innovative 3DEXPERIENCE platform, a disruptive technology that can completely transform your business. As a result, the largest discounts are for platform products, on premise or in the cloud.

As an example, a customer may have an existing Dassault Systemes CATIA V5 software and his installed base entitles them to a voucher good for 35% discount on a new product up to an amount 0f $35,000. Assume a new opportunity arises and the customer requires SIMULIA to run advanced simulations. If the list price of what is required is $100,000, then this can be purchased for $65,000 by applying the voucher.

As a trusted advisor, Tata Technologies can help navigate through the CTP program. Dassault Systemes has been investing billions into innovative technologies and helping organizations face business challenges. Please engage us to discover how your business can be transformed.

Visit www.tatatechnologies.com or contact info.americas@tatatechnologies.com

Does your organization rely on creating and using CAM (Computer Aided Machining) programs? Do you have difficulty keeping track of all your CAM data? Do you struggle with quality issues in your machining operation? If the answer is yes, you could benefit from a Machining Benchmark.

The Machining Benchmark assessment captures the opinions of senior and knowledgeable personnel in your organization on the current state and future Machining requirements for your business. In addition, a priority for improvement and an assessment of current effectiveness is recorded. It centers on 17 key Machining “Pillars” ranging from PLM Training, through to Automation and Development. The pillars are listed below:

  1. CAM Programming Capabilities
  2. CAM Maturity
  3. CAD/CAM/CNC/CMM Integration
  4. Tooling and Fixture Design
  5. CAM Best Practices
  6. CAM Validation and Simulation
  7. CAM Efficiency
  8. Version and Revision control of CAM data
  9. Supplier Collaboration
  10. Shop floor Documentation
  11. Model based Definition
  12. Quality Management
  13. Dimensional Control
  14. CAM User Support
  15. CAM Application Maintenance
  16. On boarding for CAM systems
  17. Ongoing training for CAM systems

After the 17 pillars have been covered, senior and knowledgeable personnel are also invited to “spend” an assumed benefit in value areas within your business. The areas identified are improving time to market, increasing the portfolio of the company and improving product quality.

Finally, the tool produces a comprehensive report showing the customer’s current state of maturity and a benchmark comparison with the industry.

Participants have found this process to be very useful as it allows them to prioritize their initiatives, gives a high-level view of their roadmap to success and provides them with industry benchmark information.

Does your organization struggle launch a product into manufacturing? Do you have costly launch cycles that overrun both budget and time? If the answer is yes, you could benefit from a Digital Factory Benchmark.

The Digital Factory Benchmark assessment captures the opinions of senior and knowledgeable personnel in your organization on the current state and future Digital Factory requirements for your business. In addition, a priority for improvement and an assessment of current effectiveness is recorded. It centers on 17 key Digital Factory “Pillars” ranging from Factory as Built, through to Robotic programming. The pillars are listed below:

  1. Factory As-built
  2. Digital Factory
  3. MBOM
  4. Process Planning
  5. Assembly Simulation
  6. Work Instructions
  7. Ergonomics Task Definition
  8. Ergonomic Analysis
  9. Manufacturing time library
  10. Resource Modeling
  11. Production Line Simulation
  12. Materials flow
  13. Factory infrastructure optimization
  14. Robotic offline programming
  15. Robotic Simulation
  16. Robotic Arc Welding
  17. Robotic Spot Welding

After the 17 pillars have been covered, senior and knowledgeable personnel are also invited to “spend” an assumed benefit in value areas within your business. The areas identified are improving time to market, increasing the portfolio of the company and improving product quality.

Finally, the tool produces a comprehensive report showing the customer’s current state of maturity and a benchmark comparison with the industry.

Participants have found this process to be very useful as it allows them to prioritize their initiatives, gives a high-level view of their roadmap to success and provides them with industry benchmark information.

Are you looking at investing in a MES (Manufacturing Execution System)? Do you need to improve the efficiency of your manufacturing operations with the latest technology? If you answered yes, then a MES benchmark may be exactly what is needed.

In order for you to realize the value from your current or future MES investments, you must first understand the maturity of your business and your current state. In addition, you must identify a pragmatic future state and plan a roadmap to achieve it. This may involve not only introducing new technologies and processes, but changes to your organization to support them.

Tata Technologies has developed a structured MES Analytics process with supporting tools and processes to help our customers understand the maturity of their MES, compare it to their peers and plan for the future.

The MES Benchmark assessment captures the opinions of senior and knowledgeable personnel in your organization on the current state and future MES requirements for your business, together with a priority for improvement and an assessment of current effectiveness. It centers on 17 key MES “Pillars” ranging from Scheduling Management, through to Shipping. These pillars are listed below:

  1. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Integration
  2. Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) Integration
  3. SCADA, Control and Interfaces
  4. Inventory Management
  5. Planning, Scheduling and Execution
  6. Resource Management
  7. Progress Tracking
  8. Track / Traceability / Genealogy
  9. Error Proofing
  10. Quality Management
  11. Recipe Management
  12. Work Instructions
  13. Shipping Management
  14. Shop floor Information
  15. Data Collection and Performance Analysis
  16. Maintenance Planning and execution
  17. Predictive Analytics

After the 17 pillars have been covered, senior and knowledgeable personnel are also invited to “spend” an assumed benefit in value areas within your business. The areas identified are improving time to market, increasing the portfolio of the company and improving product quality.

Finally, the tool produces a comprehensive report showing the customers current state of maturity and a benchmark comparison with the industry.

Participants have found this process to be very useful as it allows them to prioritize their initiatives, gives a high-level view of their roadmap to success and provides them with industry benchmark information

My previous post described the “Digital Twins” in general and the importance of PLM to support it. To begin with a Digital Twin need to provide the means to design, validate and optimize a part, product, manufacturing process or production facility in the virtual world using a set of computer models. It should enable companies to do these things quickly, accurately and as close as possible to the real thing – the physical counterpart. They also need to consume the data from sensors that are installed on physical objects to represent their near real-time status, working condition or position.

Digital Twins was in the making for many years , especially around advanced robotics. Siemens has recognized the value of the digital twin for a long time and enabled the development of full 3D models for automotive body assembly cells. These models were used to simulate, validate and optimize robotic operations before they were executed on the shop floor. With an extremely high degree of fidelity, these applications could not only simulate a cell, but also enable its near perfect virtual commissioning. Advances in computer science have made it possible to broaden the scope of the primitive digital twin to include many more capabilities, information, inputs and outputs. Today Siemens support digital twins for product design, manufacturing  process planning and production using the Smart  Factory loop and via smart products.

One of the most important value of a digital twin is that it enables flexibility in manufacturing and reduces the time needed for product design, manufacturing process and system planning, and production facility design; thus helping companies to develop and introduce new products to the market much faster than ever.  Connecting Engineering , manufacturing process design and actual production is the foundation and starting point for Digital Twins.

A digital twin also improves quality and even supports new business models that offer opportunities for small-to-midsize companies to expand and bring more high-tech capabilities into their shops. Digital twins will help companies become more flexible,  reduce time-to-market and costs, improve quality and increase productivity at all levels of the organization.  When implementing a true “Digital Twin” on the first day becomes a  big ask for companies,  they might want to adopt it in a phased manner, may be in a similar way it evolved – starting with automated manufacturing process design and production.  My next blog will outline the three pillars involved in deploying a digital twin .

Digital twins are the next new thing for product development in this digitalization era. They bring the physical and the digital worlds closer than ever and represent everything in the environment of a physical product, and not just the product itself and its production system.  Enabled by Product Lifecycle Management (PLM), and supported by advanced communications processes and workflows; often described as digital thread, Digital Twins represent the complete physical product throughout the entire lifecycle, end-to-end.

As products become ever more complex due to ever-increasing design complexity, regulatory requirements, higher software content, and the like, conventional simulations can constrain problem solving and decision-making. Digital Twins are much more than the typical CAE simulations with just design specifications,  materials properties, geometric models, components, and analyses such as anticipated behavior under load . It moves past the primary reliance of conventional simulations on geometry. Even the best of today’s simulations are largely limited to geometric data in CAD, CAE, and PDM solutions plus other elements contained in engineering repositories. Conventional simulations are limited to problems that are tightly circumscribed.   Digital twins have no such limitation: geometry and other engineering constraints are just starting points.  Digital Twins are virtual frameworks for managing product data that is orders of magnitude more varied than what conventional simulations handle and more importantly to turn it into actionable information -information that can be used for making decisions and for supporting those decisions as elements of business models.  This new framework uses latest digital technologies to simulate and accurately predict physical product behavior, which can change a business model and provide new revenue and value-producing opportunities; it is the process of moving to a digital business.

The growing importance of digital twins adds to PLM’s key role as the innovation platform. End-to-end digitalization of both products and processes is essential for any enterprise that intends to implement and take advantage of this new models . This means PLM itself must also continually adapt to support the design and delivery of innovative products and services and further enhance its abilities on collaboration, connectivity, and interoperability; which forms the foundations of any innovative platform .

There is an excellent story in leadership consulting lore. I’m not sure how true it is, but the lessons derived from it are incredibly valuable.

There was once a detachment of Hungarian soldiers that struck out on a reconnaissance mission from their platoon in the Alps. While they were out, there was a massive snowstorm and the soldiers lost their way – returning was impossible.  The team was worried; they were not prepared for an extended stay out in these harsh conditions, and even if they had been, how would they get back with no knowledge of their location? They had all but given up hope when one soldier, while rummaging through his uniform, found a map. He showed it to the group and a new =found sense of hope came over them. They rallied together, found shelter, and waited out the storm.

After a couple of days, the blizzard finally let up. Wearily, the soldiers set about returning to their platoon. Using the map, they identified various features of the land, and made their way back. Their commander was elated to see them alive and well. When he asked the team how they did it, the soldier showed the commander the map that had not only guided them back, but had also given them the hope to persevere.  Confused, the commander asked this soldier, “How on earth did you find your way using a map of the Pyrenees?”

This story teaches us many things; here are two:

  • Fear and anxiety can lead people to inaction, even to their own detriment (and the effect usually intensifies in groups)
  • Even with the wrong strategy or plan, the chances of success are higher than if there were no plan at all

The second point has many application in the business world.  One I think of most, in terms of our manufacturing customers, is that of their shop floors.  Often manufacturers, especially small and medium sized ones, don’t have a chance to get deep into process planning.  Stations are haphazardly placed, too many or not enough activities are scheduled at stations, new machinery is placed wherever it fits, etc.  All of this causes bottlenecks and a slower time getting things out the door.  As we all know, time is money – especially in manufacturing, where every lost minute, hour, or day translates into lost revenue.

Tata Technologies has an amazing team of technical experts and works with many solution providers that can help manufacturers find their own map. One of the maturity benchmarks we offer is for the “Digital Factory;” contact us to schedule yours.

 

This post was originally written in January of 2017.

With all the buzz about Additive Manufacturing, or 3D Printing, in the manufacturing world today, there is a lot of mystery and confusion surrounding common practices and techniques. This week’s blog post will address a common type of 3D printing known as Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF³) .

What is Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication?

It is actually part of a broader category, commonly referred to as a Filament Extrusion Techniques. Filament extrusion techniques all utilize a thin filament or wire of material. The material, typically a thermoplastic polymer, is forced through a heating element, and is extruded out in a 2D cross-section on a platform. The platform is lowered and the process is repeated until a part is completed. In most commercial machines, and higher-end consumer grade machines, the build area is typically kept at an elevated temperature to prevent part defects. The most common, and the first, technology of this type to be developed is Fused Deposition Modeling.

The Fused Deposition Modeling Technique was developed by S. Scott Crump, co-founder of Stratasys, Ltd. in the late 1980s. The technology was then patented in 1989. The patent for FDM expired in the early 2000s. This helped to give rise to the Maker movement by allowing other companies to commercialize the technology.

Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication, or EBF³ is one of the newest forms of rapid prototyping. This technique is performed with a focused electron beam and a metal wire or filament. The wire is fed through the electron beam to create a molten pool of metal. The material solidifies instantaneously once the electron beam passes through, and is able to support itself (meaning support structures generally aren’t required). This entire process must be executed under a high vacuum.

Pioneered by NASA Langley Research Center, this process is capable of producing incredibly accurate parts at full density (other additive manufacturing techniques have trouble achieving, or require secondary operations to achieve similar results). This is also one of the only techniques that can be successfully performed in zero gravity environments.

What Are the Advantages of this Process? […]

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