Category "Product Lifecycle Management"

Back in the day…

There it was, one of the first internet communities, Usenet, about to undergo a sea-change unlike any it had seen before. It was 1993, September, a month that would never end.

IT - Ethernet Cable outletIt started much like the years had before; an influx of new people coming into the universities, getting online for the first time. The community absorbed them in much the same manner as they had in the past. These first-timers were indoctrinated with the well-established etiquette and protocols that were required to thrive in this brave new world.

It seems archaic now, but back then, in the “before times”, there was no way for mass discussion; social media had not yet been born.

The plot twist

And then it happened. AOL, then a name synonymous with the internet, decided to grant access to Usenet for all of its customers. Picture the mobs that gather outside department stores the morning after Thanksgiving: the unlocking of the door let loose a mass of people that overwhelmed the community. There were just not enough graceful souls able to help coach these new users in “civilized” net behavior. Social norms were thrashed; standards went out the window. It was the equivalent of the wild, wild west. In a word, it was chaos.

Future looking

Misc-Walking-peopleNow think of how you on-board new designers or engineers. You show them who’s helpful and who to avoid. You show them around, pointing out places of interest, teach them company standards, design methodologies, workflow processes, etc. Over the coming decade (to be exact, 2014 through 2024), according to stats provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the Architecture and Engineering field will grow an average of 3.4%, or about 710,000 jobs.

The biggest (projected) job gainers:

  • Civil – 106,700
  • Mechanical – 102,500
  • Industrial – 72,800
  • Electrical – 41,100

Manufacturing - SuspensionCouple this with the BLS projection of labor force participation over the same time period where we’ll see a 1:1.3 ratio of people leaving the work force to people entering. That will be a lot of churn, meaning a lot of people to on-board. The products will be ever more complicated, and the enabling technology will be as well. Technology is cited as one of the reasons the field isn’t growing as fast as other areas.  The productivity gains in PLM are making companies more efficient, even as the complexity grows.

Conclusion

Business - Chess pawn inverseCompanies will need a strategy for managing changes in their employee base as well as the technology evolution. We offer a series of benchmarking and analysis services called PLM Analytics, and there is one specifically aimed at this issue called PLM Support. Let us know if we can help solve your Eternal September.

Any organization managing product introduction must have an underlying project plan determining how this is going to happen. Any design process goes through various stages from initial concept to final product. A generic process is illustrated below:

Project-Deliverables-Diagram

Now, this may be simple at a concept level, but can become incredibly complex at an execution level. Consider if you had a 500-person team working on a project and all of their activities needed to be coordinated. Even more crucial to the overall success is the management of deliverables – has every participant delivered his or her contribution to the project on time and to the required quality?

This is where an integrated PLM and project management system can be a powerful tool. In such a system, engineering and design deliverables are attached to tasks in a project plan, and the associated task can only be considered complete once this has occurred. If project management is executed using a standalone system, there is no link between task and deliverable; no way of knowing for certain if what is reflected in the project plan corresponds with reality.

So as a project manager, which would you prefer?

  1. A project plan that is disconnected from the required deliverables and may or may not reflect reality.
  2. An integrated system where the project plan is tied to engineering and design deliverables.

There are several consequences of such an integrated system:

  1. Project managers can immediately see if deliverables have been fulfilled. No requirement to verbally or formally query a project participant
  2. Milestone reviews can be conducted efficiently; either the milestone deliverable is in the system or it is not.
  3. Project managers are presented with real time status reports and dashboards. As a deliverable is attached to a task, the report is updated.
  4. There is no hiding the dates for completing a task. The timestamp of when a deliverable is completed is visible for all to see.

All of this allows for what the PLM world calls “automatic” or “invisible” project governance. Projects are self-governing, with all participants being aware of status in real time.

Wouldn’t you want this kind of system?

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