Posts Tagged "abaqus explicit"

This year 2019 Abaqus release has seen number of potential enhancements in Abaqus explicit. Some are general purpose while others are tied to specific procedure and application. Let’s have a look at what’s new in the explicit basket.

  • Lumped Kinetic Molecular model: This model has been developed to simulate behavior of gases that can be of much use in air bag deployment simulation. The method is based on kinetic theory of gases which states that pressure exerted by a gas in closed chamber is a result of collisions between gas molecules as well as between gas and chamber surface. These collisions are perfectly elastic in nature. As number of molecules in a mole of gas is equal to Avogadro number (6.023e23) which is very large from computational perspective, lumped mass approach is used in Abaqus in which a gas particle is defined as a collection of many molecules. The method has been validated with analytical approaches. This method now replaces the Unified Pressure Method that cannot capture the change in pressure as the airbag expands. However, LKM is computationally more expensive than UPM. Best approach might be to use LKM during airbag expansion when pressure variation is large and then switch to UPM method. Switching time should be defined in such a case. Most expensive method is still CEL.

  • C3D10 element has been introduced in explicit that is a true second order element that offers larger stable time increment compared to C3D10M or linear element. It supports all the loads and BC’s supported by conventional continuum elements in explicit.
  • Limiting stop feature: It is not possible to stop the explicit analysis when a certain output parameter reaches a limiting value. These physical parameters may be node based such as reaction forces or element based such as equivalent plastic strains. The keyword is *FILTER.
  • Improved performance: Substantial decrease in solver time when performing large system level crash simulation over high performance cluster. Below is the example of a 5M DOF crash model on multiple cores.

This blog is a part of series “what’s new in SIMULIA 2019”. Please follow our blog site regularly for next blog article on this topic.

In this article we are going to discuss an advanced friction modeling technique in Abaqus. It is based on combination rules that allows solver to compute effective friction interaction based on two contacting surfaces with different coefficients of friction. As an example, look at the following table:

If someone asks: “what is the coefficient of friction of steel?” There really is no answer to this question. The answer really depends on the other object with which steel interacts. The table shows two different values, one for steel-steel interaction and other with steel-teflon interaction. If the user has NXM matrix of materials interacting with each other and each cell of that matrix has a friction coefficient assigned to it, then modeling in Abaqus is trivial. Define surface interaction with friction coefficient for each cell and use it with corresponding surface pair in the contact property assignment. The example below highlights it.

 

But this straightforward approach is possible only if friction values for all cells are available. However, at times only the diagonal values are available. That means all the non-diagonal cell values are unknown. In that case contact property assignment is not possible.

Abaqus now allows users to define friction as surface property as well. For two different surfaces (A,B) with individual coefficient of friction, the effective friction for pair is computed as follows:

The default value of alpha is 0.3. In case of mixed problems, where surface property and contact property methods co-exist, either method can take precedence. Look at following example.

The approach is an approximation but its worth in situations where user has no access to friction coefficients values for all the contact material pairs. This friction algorithm is available in Abaqus explicit 2018 release and beyond.

 

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